N O I

Muzica tuaregilor

Pentru ca stiinta nu inseamna sa stii – chiar daca aceasta stiinta ne este atat de draga noua, celor a caror sudoare este impregnata adanc de mirosul de plastic, iar amprenta noastra este colorata de praful de pe tastatura  – stiinta oamenilor superiori – inferioritatea  noastra. 

Desi este cat se poate de clar ca a sti inseamna a trai – indiferent de orice opozitie, de orice contradictie. Poate de aceea, ne este atat de greau sa suportam viata,poate de aceea o iubim atat de mult…

Traditional Tuareg music has two major components: the moncord violin anzad played often during night parties and a small tambour covered with goatskin called tende, performed during camel and horse races, and other festivities. Traditional songs called Asak and Tisiway (poems) are sung by women and men during feasts and social occasions. Another popular Tuareg musical genre is takamba, characteristic for its Afro-Berber percussions.

Vocal music

  • tisiway: poems
  • tasikisikit: songs performed by women, accompanied by tende, men on camel back turn around
  • asak: songs accompanied by anzad monocord violin.
  • tahengemmit: slow songs sung by elder men

Children and youth music

  • Bellulla songs made by children playing with the lips
  • Fadangama small monocord instrument for children
  • Odili flute made from trunk of sorghum
  • Gidga small wooden instrument with irons sticks to make strident sounds

Dance

  • tagest: dance made while seated, moving the head, the hands and the shoulders.
  • ewegh: strong dance performed by men, in couples and groups.
  • agabas: dance for modern ishumar guitars: women and men in groups.

In the 1980s rebel fighters founded Tinariwen, a Tuareg band that fuses electric guitars and indigenous musical styles. Tinariwen is one of the best known and authentic Tuareg bands. Especially in areas that were cut off during the Tuareg rebellion (e.g., Adrar des Iforas), they were practically the only music available, which made them locally famous and their songs/lyrics (e.g. Abaraybone, …) are well known by the locals. They released their first CD in 2000, and toured in Europe and the United States in 2004. Tuareg guitar groups that followed in their path include Group Inerane and Group Bombino. The Niger-based band Etran Finatawa combines Tuareg and Wodaabe members, playing a combination of traditional instruments and electric guitars.

Many music groups emerged after the 1980s cultural revival. Among the Tartit, Imaran and known artists are: Abdallah Oumbadougou from Ayr, Baly Othmany of Djanet.

     Genuri musicale, artisti si grupuri

Traditional Music

  • Majila Ag Khamed Ahmad, singer Asak (vocal music), of Aduk, Niger
  • Almuntaha female Anzad (Tuareg violin) player, of Aduk, Niger
  • Ajju female Anzad (Tuareg violin) player, of Agadez, Niger
  • Islaman singer, genre Asak (vocal music), of Abalagh, Niger
  • Tambatan singer, genre Asak (vocal music), Tchin-Tabaraden, Niger
  • Alghadawiat female Anzad (Tuareg violin) player, of Akoubounou, Niger
  • Taghdu female Anzad (Tuareg violin) player, of Aduk, Niger

Ishumar Music or Teshumara music style

  • In Tayaden singer and guitar player, Adagh
  • Abareybon singer and guitar player, Tinariwen group, Adagh
  • Kiddu Ag Hossad singer and guitar player, Adagh
  • Baly Othmani singer, luth player, Djanet, Azjar
  • Abdalla Ag Umbadugu, singer, Takrist N’Akal group, Ayr
  • Hasso Ag Akotey, singer, Ayr

   Festivaluri

The Desert Festival in Mali’s Timbuktu provides one opportunity to see Tuareg culture and dance and hear their music.

Other festivals include:

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